Lady Jane Grey 2017-07-13T05:17:09+00:00

Lady Jane’s reign was so short and contested that she is not included in some lists of kings and queens of England. On the other hand, her life has been told and retold in biographies, novels, short stories, poems, movies, and paintings. This book is an attempt to bypass many myths to introduce Jane as we see her in credible historical documents – a young girl who found God’s strength sufficient to sustain her in a formidable trial.

Click here to see some sample pages.

Finalist at the 2012 San Diego Book Awards

Endorsements

“The dramatic story of Lady Jane Grey has captured the imagination of people of all ages and eras–high-stake royal politics, ruthless power-plays, religious controversies and tragic ending.  Despite it all, the biblical faith of this remarkable teen-ager gave her dignity under pressure and a firm hope that did not disappoint.  Simonetta Carr is to be greatly thanked for introducing a new generation of children to Lady Jane and her inspiring example of Christian faithfulness.” – Rev. Canon Dr. John Ashley Null, Fellow, Royal Historical Society, London, and Research Fellow, Theological Faculty, Humboldt University of Berlin

“The short life and remarkable testimony of Lady Jane Grey is one of the extraordinary stories of Christendom. As a grandmother of twelve, I am grateful for a book that shows young readers the power of the gospel in the life of a young girl and that inspires them to live for God’s glory. — Susan Hunt, Pastor’s wife, mother, grandmother, speaker, and author of numerous books for women and children, including Heirs of the Covenant and Big Truths for Little kids.

“This is a lively book based on careful research and will meet a real need. Simonetta Carr tells the story of  one of the most remarkable young people in English history. Not only was Jane Grey frighteningly bright but she stood up for herself in an age when girls were meant to be submissive. Most of all, despite being all alone, she defended her Christian beliefs vigorously and refused to abandon her faith in Jesus Christ, even though she knew that would mean she would be beheaded. The lessons for today are inescapable.” – Dr. Eric Ives, Professor of English History (emeritus) at the University of Birmingham and author of, among other works, Lady Jane Grey, A Tudor Mystery.

“Simonetta Carr has done it again: a lavishly illustrated and beautifully told story of an important Christian figure. Further, unlike so many women in church history who are known to us more as the wife or daughter of some famous saint, Lady Jane Grey possesses an importance all of her own. As with all of Simonetta’s books, this is one to read and to cherish. ”
– Carl Trueman, Professor of Historical Theology and Church History and Paul Woolley Chair of Church History at Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia.

“Ms Carr was exceptionally diligent in researching the historical events detailed in this book, so that her book is far more historically accurate than most children’s books on Jane Grey.” J. Stephan Edwards, PhD

 

Reviews

Gentle Reformation

Book Moms

Heavenly Springs

Reformation21 – Carl Trueman

Reformation21 – William Boekestein

Yinkahdinay

The Hankins Family

Fundamentally Reformed

Emeth Aletheia

Delivering Grace

Homeschool Mosaics

Ligonier

New Horizons

Redeemed Reader

Ascribeblog (scroll down to see review)

Evangelical Times

Principled Academy

Book Trailer

Lady Jane Grey

 

Articles

Mentoring Moments

Ligonier

About the Ilustrator

Matt Abraxas has traveled from California to France, studying different approaches to art. He enjoys creating and teaching art, and currently exhibits his work at the SmithKlein Gallery in Boulder, Colorado. Matt lives with his wife Rebecca and two sons, Zorba and Rainer, in Lafayette, Colorado. You may visit his website. The original oil paintings used for the illustrations are on sale.

 

Errata Corrige

On page 10, I said that, after Jane, Francis and Harry Grey had two more daughters and two sons. As far as we can tell by the documents available, this is wrong. They probably had one son named Henry before Jane, but he died as an infant, probably in his first year. There is also a possibility that Francis had a son from a second marriage. In any case, Francis and Harry did not have two sons together. I was given this mistaken information by an expert who has since apologized for the confusion. I also apologize for not checking his information against other sources. It’s a good lesson learned, and this mistake will be corrected at the first available opportunity.